WWW.DISSERS.RU


...
    !

Pages:     | 1 | 2 ||

Van Putten, Wilhelmus Frederik On host race differentiation in smut fungi / Wilhelmus Frederik van Putten. - Utrecht: ...

-- [ 3 ] --

Among other combinations of host species and host races, for instance those that cannot cross-infect each others host species (see e.g. Zillig 1921), and between which the genetic distances are much larger (see e.g. Perlin 1996;

Perlin et al. 1997;

Shykoff et al. 1999), one would expect to find examples that approach Jeanikes criteria for belonging to different sibling species, rather than being different host races of the same species (Jeanike 1981). Some studies on host pathogen systems, have shown that the phylogenetic trees of host species and their pathogens were correlated, e.g. in some Ustilago species and their graminaceous host species (Bakkeren et al. 2000), suggesting coevolution of specialized host-pathogen systems. Future research may reveal matching phylogenies of anther smut fungi and their caryophyllaceous host species as well, since the Silene-Microbotryum system seems to be an ideal model system to gather additional evidence for such coevolutionary relationships. Since the relatedness of host species and the relatedness of their smut isolates seem to be related, the future of the host races from S. latifolia and S. dioica may be tightly connected to the ongoing evolution of these plant species.

ALEXANDER HM (1989) An experimental field study of anther-smut disease of Silene alba caused by Ustilago violacea: genotypic variation and disease incidence. Evolution 43: 835-847.

ALEXANDER HM (1990) Epidemiology of anther-smut infection of Silene alba caused by Ustilago violacea: patterns of spore deposition and disease incidence. Journal of Ecology 78: 166-179.

ALEXANDER HM and J ANTONOVICS (1995) Spread of anther-smut disease (Ustilago violacea) and character correlations in a genetically variable experimental population of Silene alba. Journal of Ecology 83: 783-794.

ALTIZER S, PH THRALL and J ANTONOVICS (1998) Vector behaviour and the transmission of anther-smut infection in Silene alba. American Midland Naturalist 139: 147-163.

ANTONOVICS J, D STRATTON, PH THRALL and A. M. JAROSZ (1996) An anther-smut disease (Ustilago violacea) of fire-pink (Silene virginica): its biology and relationship to the anther smut disease of white campion (Silene alba). American Midland Naturalist 135: 130-143.

AUDRAN JC and M BATCHO (1981) Microsporogenesis and pollen grains in Silene dioica (L.) Cl.

and alterations in its anthers parasited by Ustilago violacea (Pers.) Rouss. (Ustilaginales).

Acta Societatis Botanicorum Poloniae 50: 29-32.

BAIRD ML and ED GARBER (1979) Genetics of Ustilago violacea. V. Outcrossing and selfing in teliospore inoculation. Botanical Gazette 140: 89-93.

BAKER HG (1947) Infection of species of Melandrium by Ustilago violacea (Pers.) Fuckel and the transmission of the resultant disease. Annals of Botany 11: 333-348.

BAKER HG (1948) Stages in invasion and replacement demonstrated by species of Melandrium.

Journal of Ecology 36: 96-119.

BAKER HG (1951) The inheritance of certain characters in crosses between Melandrium dioicum and M. album. Genetica 25: 126-156.

BAKER HG (1961) The adaptation of flowering plants to nocturnal and nocturnal and crepuscular pollinators. Quarterly Review of Biology 36: 64-73.

BAKER HG and PD HURD (1968) Intrafloral ecology. Annual Review of Entomology 13: 385-414.

BAKKEREN G, G KRONSTAD and CA LEVESQUE (2000) Comparison of AFLP fingerprints and ITS sequences as phylogenetic markers in Ustilaginomycetes. Mycologia 92: 510-521.

BARTON NH and M SLATKIN (1986) A quasi-equilibrium theory of the distribution of rare alleles in a subdivided population. Heredity 56: 409-415.

BERLOCHER, SH (1998a) Can sympatric speciation via host or habitat shift be proven from phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence, pp. 99-113 in Endless forms, edited by DJ Howard and SH Berlocher. Oxford University Press, New York.

BERLOCHER SH (1998b) Origins: A brief history of research on speciation, pp. 3-18 in Endless forms, edited by D. J. Howard and S. H. Berlocher. Oxford University Press, New York.

BERTIN RI and MF WILLSON (1980) Effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollination of two milkweeds. Canadian Journal of Botany 58: 1744-1746.

BIERE A and J ANTONOVICS (1996) Sex-specific costs of resistance tot the fungal pathogen Ustilago violacea (Microbotryum violaceum) in Silene alba. Evolution 50: 1098-1110.

BIERE A and S HONDERS (1996a) Host adaptation in the anther smut fungus Ustilago violacea (Microbotryum violaceum): infection success, spore production and alteration of floral traits on two host species and their F1 hybrid. Oecologia 107: 307-320.

BIERE A and S HONDERS (1996b) Impact of flowering phenology of Silene alba and S. dioica on susceptibility to fungal infection and seed predation. OIKOS 77: 467-480.

BIERE A and SH HONDERS (1998) Anther smut transmission in Silene latifolia and Silene dioica:

impact of host traits, disease frequency, and host density. International Journal of Plant Sciences 159: 228-235.

BIERZYCHUDEK P (1987) Pollinators increase the cost of sex by avoiding female flowers. Ecology 68: 444-447.

BOSCH M and NM WASER (1999) Effects of local density on pollination and reproduction in Delphinium nuttallianum and Aconitum columbianum (Ranunculaceae). American Journal of Botany 86: 871-879.

BLKER M and R KAHMANN (1993) Sexual pheromones and mating responses in fungi. Plant Cell 5: 1461-1469.

BRANTJES NBM (1976a) Riddles around the pollination of Melandrium album (Mill.) Garcke (Caryophyllaceae) during the oviposition by Hadena bicruris Hufn. (Noctuidae, Lepidoptera), I. Proceeding of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen Series C 79: 1 12.

BRANTJES NBM (1976b) Riddles around the pollination of Melandrium album (Mill.) Garcke (Caryophylaceae) during the oviposition by Hadena bicruris Hufn. (Noctuidae, Lepidoptera), II. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen Series C 79:

127-141.

BRANTJES NBM (1978) Sensory responses to flowers in night-flying moths, pp. 13-19 in The pollination of flowers by insects, edited by A. J. Richards. Academic Press, London.

BRANTJES NBM (1981) Wind as a factor influencing flower-visiting by Hadena bicruris (Noctuidae) and Deilephila elpenor (Sphingidae). Ecological Entomology 6: 361-363.

BRASIER CM and MJ GRIFFIN (1979) Taxonomy of Phytophtera palmivora on cocoa.

Transactions of the British Mycological Society 72: 111-143.

BRASIER CM (1987) The dynamics of fungal speciation, pp. 231-260 in Evolutionary biology of the fungi, edited by A. D. M. Rayner, C. M. Brasier and D. Moore. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

BUCHELI E, B GAUTSCHI and JA SHYKOFF (1998) Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum. Molecular Ecology 7: 665-666.

BUCHELI E and JA SHYKOFF (1999) The influence of plant spacing on density-dependent versus frequency-dependent spore transmission of the anther smut Microbotryum violaceum.

Oecologia 119: 55-62.

BUCHELI E, B GAUTSCHI and JA SHYKOFF (2000) Host-specific differentiation in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum as revealed by microsatellites. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 13: 188-198.

BUCHELI E, B GAUTSCHI and JA SHYKOFF (2001) Differences in population structure of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum on two closely related host species, Silene latifolia and S. dioica. Molecular Ecology 10: 285-294.

BURDON JJ, AM JAROSZ and GC KIRBY (1989) Pattern and patchiness in plant-pathogen interactions - Causes and consequences. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 20: 119 136.

BURDON JJ and PH THRALL (1999) Spatial and temporal patterns in coevolving plant and pathogen associations. American Naturalist 153: S15-S33.

BURNETT JH (1983) Speciation in fungi. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 81: 1-14.

BUSH GL (1969) Sympatric host race formation and speciation in frugivorous flies of the genus Rhagoletis (Diptera, Tephritidae). Evolution 23: 237-251.

CARLSSON-GRANR U (1997) Anther-smut disease in Silene dioica: variation in susceptibility among genotypes and populations. and patterns of disease within populations. Evolution 51:

1416-1426.

CARLSSON-GRANR U, T ELMQVIST, J GREN, H GARDFJELL and P INGVARSSON (1998) Floral sex ratios, disease and seed set in dioecious Silene dioica. Journal of Ecology 86: 79-91.

CARROLL SB and LF DELPH (1996) The effects of gender and plant architecture on allocation to flowers in dioecious Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae). International Journal of Plant Sciences 157: 493-500.

CASTLE AJ and AW DAY (1984) Isolation and identification of -tocopherol as an inducer of the parasitic phase of Ustilago violacea. Phytopathology 74: 1194-1200.

CELERIN M and AW DAY (1998) Sex, smut, and RNA: the complexity of fungal fimbriae.

International Journal of Plant Sciences 159: 175-184.

COYNE JA and HA ORR (1989) Patterns of speciation in Drosophila. Evolution 43: 362-381.

COYNE JA (1992) Genetics and Speciation. Nature 355: 511-515.

CROW JF and K AOKI (1984) Group selection for a polygenic behavioral trait: estimating the degree of population subdivision. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 81: 6073 6077.

CUMMINS JE and AW DAY (1977) Genetic and cell cycle analysis of a smut fungus (Ustilago violacea), pp. 445-469 in Methods in cell biology, edited by D. M. Prescott. Academic Press, New York.

DAY AW (1976) Communication by fimbriae during mating in a fungus. Nature 262: 583-584.

DAY AW (1980) Competition and distribution studies of genetically marked strains of Ustilago violacea in the same host plant. Botanical Gazette 141: 313-320.

DAY AW, AJ CASTLE and JE CUMMINS (1981) Regulation of parasitic development of the anther smut fungus Ustilago violacea, by extracts from host plants. Botanical Gazette 142: 135-146.

DAY AW and JE CUMMINS (1981) The genetics and cellular biology of sexual development in Ustilago violacea, pp. 379-402 in Sexual interactions in eukaryotic microbes, edited by D. H.

ODay and P. A. Horgen. Academic Press, New York.

DAY AW and ED GARBER (1988) Ustilago violacea, anther smut of the Caryophyllaceae, pp. 457 482 in Genetics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi, edited by G. S. Sidhu. Academic Press, London.

DEACON JW and SP DONALDSON (1993) Molecular Recognition in the Homing Responses of Zoosporic Fungi, with Special Reference to Pythium and Phytophthora. Mycological Research 97: 1153-1171.

DELMOTTE F, E BUCHELI and JA SHYKOFF (1999) Host and parasite population structure in a natural plant-pathogen system. Heredity 82: 300-308.

DELPH LF and TR MEAGHER (1995) Sexual dimorphism masks life history trade-offs in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. Ecology 76: 775-785.

DEML G and F OBERWINKLER (1982) Studies in heterobasidiomycetes. Part 241 ). On Ustilago violacea (Pers.) Rouss. from Saponaria officinalis L. Phytopathologische Zeitschrift 104:

345-356.

DESFAUX C and B LEJEUNE (1996) Systematics of Euromediterranean Silene (Caryophyllaceae):

evidence from a phylogenetic analysis using ITS sequences. C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Life Sciences 319: 351-358.

DIECKMANN U and M DOEBELI (1999) On the origin of species by sympatric speciation. Nature 400: 354-357.

DOBZHANSKY T (1970) Genetics of the evolutionary process. Columbia University Press, New York.

EDMUNDS GF and DN ALSTAD (1978) Coevolution in insect herbivores and conifers. Science 199:

941-945.

EL MOUSADIK A and RJ PETIT (1996) High level of genetic differentiation for allelic richness among populations of the argan tree [Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels] endemic to Morocco.

Theoretical and Applied Genetics 92: 832-839.

ELLEGREN H, CR PRIMMER and BC SHELDON (1995) Microsatellite evolution: directionality or bias? Nature genetics 11: 360-362.

ELLEGREN H (2000) Microsatellite mutations in the germline: implications for evolutionary inference. Trends in Genetics 16: 551-558.

EXCOFFIER L, P SMOUSE and J QUATTRO (1992) Analysis of molecular variance inferred from metric distances among DNA haplotypes: application to human mitochondrial DNA restriction data. Genetics 131.

FEDER JL (1998) The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella: flies in the face of conventional wisdom about speciation?, pp. 130-144 in Endless forms, edited by D. J. Howard and S. H.

Berlocher. Oxford University Press, New York.

FEDERICI BA (1982) Inviability of interspecific hybrids in the Coelomyces dodgei complex.

Mycologia 74: 555-562.

FELSENSTEIN J (1993) PHYLIP (Phylogeny Inference Package) version 3.5c, pp. Department of Genetics, University of Washington, USA, Seattle.

FENSTER CB, CL HASSLER and MR DUDASH (1996) Fluorescent dye particles are good pollen analogs for hummingbird-pollinated Silene virginica (Caryophyllaceae). Canadian Journal of Botany 74: 189-193.

FISCHER GW and CS HOLTON (1957) Biology and control of the smut fungi. Ronald Press, New York.

FITZSIMMONS NN, C MORITZ and SS MOORE (1995) Conservation and dynamics of microsatellite loci over 300 million years of marine turtle evolution. Molecular Biology and Evolution 12:

432-440.

FLOATE KD and TG WITHAM (1993) The Hybrid Bridge hypothesis: host shifting via plant hybrid swarms. American Naturalist 141: 651-662.

FRY JD (1996) The evolution of host specialization: Are trade-offs overrated? American Naturalist 148: S84-S107.

GALEN C and ML STANTON (1989) Bumble bee pollination and floral morphology: factors influencing pollen dispersal in the alpine sky pilot, Polemonium viscosum (Polemoniaceae).

American Journal Botany 76: 419-426.

GANDON S, Y CAPOWIEZ Y DUBOIS Y MICHALAKIS and I OLIVIERI (1996) Local adaptation and gene-for-gene coevolution in a metapopulation model. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 263: 1003-1009.

GARBER ED, ML BAIRD and DJ CHAPMAN (1975) Genetics of Ustilago violacea I. Carotenoid mutants and carotenogenesis. Botanical Gazette 136: 341-346.

GIRAUD T, D FORTINI, C LAMARQUE, P LEROUX, K LOBUGLIO et al. (1999) Two sibling species of the Botrytis cinerea complex, transposa and vacuma, are found in sympatry on numerous host plants. Phytopathology 89: 967-973.

GLASS LN and DA KULDAU (1992) Mating type and vegetative incompatibility in filamentous ascomycetes. Annual Review of Phytopathology 30: 201-224.

GOLDSTEIN DB and C SCHLTTERER (Editors) (1999) Microsatellites: evolution and applications.

Oxford University Press, Oxford.

GOTOH T, J BRUIN, MW SABELIS and SBJ MENKEN (1993) Host race formation in Tetranchus urticae: genetic differentiation, host plant preference, and mate choice in a tomato and a cucumber strain. Entomologia experimentalis et applicata 68: 171-178.

GOUDET J (1995) FSTAT (vers. 1.2): a computer program to calculate F-statistics. Journal of Heredity 86: 485-486.

GOULSON D and K JERRIM (1997) Maintenance of the species boundary between Silene dioica and S. latifolia (red and white campion). OIKOS 79: 115-126.

GOULSON D, JC STOUT, SA HAWSON and JA ALLEN (1998) Floral display size in comfrey, Symphytum officinale L. (Boraginaceae): relationships with visitation by three bumblebee species and subsequent seed set. Oecologia 113: 502-508.

GOULSON D and NP WRIGHT (1998) Flower constancy in the hoverflies Episyrphus balteatus (Degeer) and Syrphus ribesii (L.) (Syrphidae). Behavioral Ecology 9: 213-219.

GREGORY PH (1968) Interpreting plant disease dispersal gradients. Annual Review of Phytopathology 6: 189-212.

GROMAN JD and O PELLMYR (1999) The pollination biology of Manfreda virginica (Agavaceae):

relative contribution of diurnal and nocturnal visitors. OIKOS 87: 373-381.

GROSS KL and JD SOULE (1981) Differences in biomass allocation to reproductive and vegetative structures of male and female plants of a dioecious, perennial herb, Silene alba (Miller) Krause. American Journal of Botany 68: 801-807.

GUITIAN P, J GUITIAN and L NAVARRO (1993) Pollen transfer and diurnal versus nocturnal pollination in Lonicera etrusca. Acta Oecologia 14: 219-227.

GUO SW and EA THOMPSON (1992) Performing the exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions for multiple alleles. Biometrics 48: 361-372.

HANCOCK JM (1999) Microsatellites and other simple sequences: genomic context and mutational mechanisms, pp. 1-9 in Microsatellites: evolution and applications, edited by D. B. Goldstein and C. Schltterer. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

HARRISON RG (1998) Linking evolutionary pattern and process: The relevance of species concepts for the study of speciation, pp. 19-31 in Endless forms, edited by D. J. Howard and S. H.

Berlocher. Oxford University Press, New York.

HASLETT JR (1989) Interpreting patterns of resource utilization: randomness and selectivity in pollen feeding by adult hoverflies. Oecologia 78: 433-442.

HASSAN A and JA MACDONALD (1971) Ustilago violacea on Silene dioica. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 56: 451-461.

HEDRICK PW (1999) Perspective: Highly variable loci and their interpretation in evolution and conservation. Evolution 53: 313-318.

HEINRICH B (1976) The foraging specializations of individual bumblebees. Ecological Monographs 46: 105-128.

HEMBORG M (1998) Seasonal dynamics in reproduction of first-year females and males in Silene dioica. International Journal of Plant Sciences 159: 958-967.

HEMBORG M and PS KARLSSON (1999) Sexual differences in biomass and nutrient allocation of first-year Silene dioica plants. Oecologia 118: 453-460.

HENDERSON ST and TD PETES (1992) Instability of simple sequence DNA in Sacharomyces cereviiae. Molecular Biology of the Cell 12: 2749-2757.

HERRE EA (1993) Population structure and the evolution of virulence in nematode parasites of fig wasps. Science 259: 1442-1445.

HERRERA CM (1987) Components of pollinator quality: comparative analysis of a diverse insect assemblage. OIKOS 50: 79-90.

HERRERA CM (1989) Pollinator abundance, morphology, and flower visitation rate: analysis of the quantity component in a plant-pollinator system. Oecologia 80: 241-248.

HERRERA CM (1995) Microclimate and individual variation in pollinators: flowering plants are more than their flowers. Ecology 76: 1516-1524.

HIGASHI M, G TAKIMOTO and N YAMAMURA (1999) Sympatric speciation by sexual selection.

Nature 402: 523-526.

HOOD ME and J ANTONOVICS (1998) Two-celled promycelia and mating-type segregation in Ustilago violacea (Microbotryum violaceum). International Journal of Plant Sciences 159:

199-205.

HOOD ME and J ANTONOVICS (2000) Intratetrad mating, heterozygosity, and the maintenance of deleterious alleles in Microbotryum violaceum (=Ustilago violacea). Heredity 85: 231-241.

INGOLD CT (1971) Fungal spores. Their liberation and dispersal. Clarendon Press, Oxford.

INGOLD CT (1983) The basidium in Ustilago. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 81:

573-584.

INGVARSSON PK and L ERICSON (1998) Spatial and temporal variation in disease levels of a floral smut (Anthracoida heterospora) on Carex nigra. Journal of Ecology 86: 53-61.

JAENIKE J (1981) Criteria for ascertaining the existence of host races. American Naturalist 117: 830 834.

JAENIKE J (1990) Host specialization in phytophagous insects. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 21: 243-273.

JAROSZ AM and AL DAVELOS (1995) Effects of disease in wild plant populations and the evolution of pathogen aggressiveness. New Phytologist 129: 371-388.

JEGER MJ (1990) Mathematical analysis and modeling of spatial aspects of plant disease epidemics., pp. in Epidemics of plant diseases: mathematical analysis and modeling, edited by J Kranz.

Springer-Verlag, New York NY USA.

JENNERSTEN O (1983) Butterfly visitors as vectors of Ustilago violacea spores between caryophyllaceous plants. OIKOS 40: 125-130.

JENNERSTEN O (1988) Insect dispersal of fungal disease: effects of Ustilago infection on pollinator attraction in Viscaria vulgaris. OIKOS 5: 163-170.

JONES KN, JS REITHEL and RE IRWIN (1998) A trade-off between the frequency and duration of bumblebee visits to flowers. Oecologia 117: 161-168.

JONES KN and JS REITHEL (2001) Pollinator-mediated selection on a flower color polymorphism in experimental populations of Antirrhinum (Scrophulariaceae). American Journal of Botany 88:

447-454.

JRGENS A, T WITT and G GOTTSBERGER (1996) Reproduction and pollination in Central European populations of Silene and Saponaria species. Botanica Acta 109: 316-324.

JRGENS A, T WITT and G GOTTSBERGER (2001) Flower scent composition in night-flowering Silene species (Caryophyllaceae). Biochemical Systematics and Ecology. In press.

KALTZ O and JA SHYKOFF (1997) Sporidial mating-type of teliospores from natural populations of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum (= Ustilago) violaceum. International Journal of Plant Sciences 158: 575-584.

KALTZ O and JA SHYKOFF (1999) Selfing vs. outcrossing propensity of the fungal plant pathogen Microbotryum violaceum across Silene latifolia host plants. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 12: 340-349.

KALTZ O, S GANDON, Y MICHALAKIS and JA SHYKOFF (1999) Local maladaptation in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum to its host plant Silene latifolia: Evidence from a cross inoculation experiment. Evolution 53: 395-407.

KALTZ O and JA SHYKOFF (2001) Male and female Silene latifolia plants differ in per-contact risk of infection by a sexually transmitted disease. Journal of Ecology 89: 99-109.

KAWECKI TJ (1997) Sympatric speciation via habitat specialization driven by deleterious mutations.

Evolution 51: 1751-1763.

KAWECKI TJ (1998) Red Queen meets Santa Rosalia: arms races and the evolution of host specialization in organisms with parasitic lifestyles. American Naturalist 152: 635-651.

KAY QON (1976) Preferential pollination of yellow-flowered morphs of Raphanus raphanistrum by Pieris and Eristalis spp. Nature 261: 230-232.

KAY QON, AJ LACK, FC BAMBER and CR DAVIES (1984) Differences between sexes in floral morphology, nectar production and insect visits in a dioecious species, Silene dioica. New Phytologist 98: 515-529.

KIANG YT (1972) Pollination study in a natural population of Mimulus guttatus. Evolution 26: 308 310.

KIMURA M (1955) Solution of a process of random genetic drift with a continuous model.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 41: 144-150.

KIMURA M and T OHTA (1978) Stepwise mutation model and distribution of allelic frequencies in a finite population. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 75: 2868-2872.

KLINKHAMER PGL, TJ DE JONG and GJ DE BRUYN (1989) Plant size and pollinator visitation in Cynoglossum officinale. OIKOS 54: 201-204.

KOKONTIS J and M RUDDAT (1986) Promotion of hyphal growth in Ustilago violacea by host factors from Silene alba. Archives of Microbiology 144: 302-306.

KOKONTIS JM and M RUDDAT (1989) Enzymatic hydrolysis of hyphal growth factors for Ustilago violacea isolated from the host plant Silene alba. Botanical Gazette 150: 439-444.

KONDRASHOV AS and MV MINA (1986) Sympatric speciation: when is it possible? Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 27: 201-223.

KONDRASHOV AS and M SHPAK (1998) On the origin of species by means of assortative mating.

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B. 265: 2273-2278.

LEE JA (1981) Variation in the infection of Silene dioica (L.) Clairv. by Ustilago violacea (Pers.) Fuckel in North West England. New Phytologist 87: 81-89.

LEVIN DA and WA ANDERSON (1970) Competition for pollinators between simultaneously flowering species. American Naturalist 104: 455-467.

LIRO JI (1924) Die Ustilagineen Finnlands, I. Annales Academiae Scientiarum Fennicae 17A: 1-636.

LLOYD DG (1974) Female predominant sex ratios in angiosperms. Heredity 32: 34-44.

MALLOCH G, B FENTON and RDJ BUTCHER (2000) Molecular evidence for multiple infections of a new subgroup of Wolbachia in the European raspberry beetle Byturus tomentosus. Molecular Ecology 9: 77-90.

MANTEL N (1967) The detection of disease clustering and a generalized regression approach. Cancer Research 27: 209-220.

MATSUNAGA S, S KAWANO, H TAKANO, H UCHIDA, S SAKAI et al. (1996) Isolation and developmental expression of male reproductive organ-specific genes in a dioecious campion, Melandrium album (Silene latifolia). Plant Journal 10: 679-689.

MAYNARD SMITH J (1966) Sympatric speciation. American Naturalist 100: 637-650.

MAYR E (1963) Animal species and evolution. Harvard University Press, Cambridge MA.

MCCAULEY DE (1991) The effect of host plant patch size variation on the population structure of a specialist herbivore insect, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus. Evolution 45: 1675-1684.

MCDERMOTT JM and BA MCDONALD (1993) Gene flow in plant pathosystems. Annual Review Phytopathology 31: 353-373.

MEAGHER TR (1992) The quantitative genetics of sexual dimorphism in Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae). I. Genetic variation. Evolution 46: 445-457.

MICHALAKIS Y and L EXCOFFIER (1996) A generic estimation of population subdivision using distances between alleles with special reference to microsatellite loci. Genetics 142: 1061 1064.

MITCHELL RJ and NM WASER (1992) Adaptive significance of ipomopsis aggregata nectar production: pollination succes of single flowers. Ecology 73: 633-638.

MOPPER S (1996) Adaptive genetic structure in phytophagous insect populations. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 11: 235-238.

MORRIS, WF, MV. PRICE, NM WASER, JD THOMSON, B THOMSON et al. (1994) Systemic increase in pollen carryover and its consequences for geitonogamy in plant populations.

OIKOS 71: 431-440.

MLLER AP and M ERIKSSON (1995) Pollinator preference for symmetrical flowers and sexual selection in plants. OIKOS 73: 15-22.

MULCAHY DL (1967) Optimal sex ratio in Silene alba. Heredity 22: 411-423.

NAUTA MJ and FJ WEISSING (1996) Constraints on allele size at microsatellite loci: implication for genetic differentiation. Genetics 143: 1021-1032.

NAVARRO L (2000) Pollination ecology of Anthyllis vulneraria (Fabaceae): nectar robbers as pollinators. American Journal of Botany 87: 980-985.

NEI M (1987) Molecular Evolutionary Genetics. Columbia University Press, New York.

NEWTON MR, LL KINKEL and KJ LEONARD (1997) Competition and density-dependent fitness in a plant parasitic fungus. Ecology 78: 1774-1784.

NEWTON MR, AS WRIGHT, LL KINKEL and KJ LEONARD (1999) Competition alters temporal dynamics of sporulation in the wheat stem rust fungus. Journal of Phytopathology 147: 527 534.

NOOR MAF (1999) Reinforcement and other consequences of sympatry. Heredity 83: 503-508.

ONO T (1939) Polyploidy and sex determination in Melandrium. Botanical Magazine 53: 549-556.

ORR MR and TB SMITH (1998) Ecology and Speciation. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 13: 502 506.

OSTER G and B HEINRICH (1976) Why do bumblebees major? A mathematical model. Ecological Monographs 46: 129-133.

OUDEMANS PV, HM ALEXANDER, J ANTONOVICS, S ALTIZER, PH THRALL et al. (1998) The distribution of mating-type bias in natural populations of the anther-smut Ustilago violacea on Silene alba in Virginia. Mycologia 90: 372-381.

PAPPERS SM, TJ DE JONG, PGL KLINKHAMER and E MEELIS (1999) Effects of nectar content on the number of bumblebee approaches and the length of visitation sequences in Echium vulgare (Boraginaceae). OIKOS 87: 580-586.

PEEVER TL, Y CANIHOS, L OLSEN, A IBAEZ, YC LIU et al. (1999) Population genetic structure and host specificity of Alternaria spp. causing brown spot of minneola tangelo and rough lemon in Florida. Phytopathology 89: 851-860.

PEEVER TL, L OLSEN, A IBAEZ and LW TIMMER (2000) Genetic differentiation and host specificity among populations of Alternaria spp. causing Brown Spot of grapefruit and tangerine x grapefruit hybrids in Florida. Phytopathology 90: 407-414.

PEMBERTON JM, J SLATE, DR BANCROFT and JA BARRETT (1995) Nonamplifying alleles at microsatellite loci: a caution for parentage and population studies. Molecular Ecology 4: 249 252.

PERLIN MH (1996) Pathovars or Formae speciales of Microbotryum violaceum differ in electrophoretic karyotype. International Journal of Plant Sciences 157: 447-452.

PERLIN MH, C HUGHES, J WELCH, S AKKARAJU, D STEINECKER et al. (1997) Molecular approaches to differentiate subpopulations or formae speciales of the fungal phytopathogen Microbotryum violaceum. International Journal of Plant Sciences 158: 568-574.

PFUNDER M and BA ROY (2000) Pollinator-mediated interactions between a pathogenic fungus, Uromyces pisi (Pucciniaceae), and its host plant, Euphorbia cyparissias (Euphorbiaceae).

American Journal of Botany 87: 48-55.

PIEPENBRING M, G HAGEDORN and F OBERWINKLER (1998) Spore Liberation and Dispersal in Smut Fungi. Botanica Acta 111: 444-460.

PONTECORVO G (1956) The parasexual cycle in fungi. Annual Review of Microbiology 10: 393-400.

POON NH, J MARTIN and AW DAY (1974) Conjugation in Ustilago violacea. I. Morphology.

Canadian Journal of Microbiology 20: 187-191.

POON NH and AW DAY (1975) Fungal fimbriae. I. Structure, origin, and synthesis. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 21: 537-546.

PORTER JW and RE LINCOLN (1950) Lycopersicon selections containing a high content of carotenes and colourless polyenes. II. The mechanism of carotene biosynthesis. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 27.

PORTER JW and DG ANDERSON (1962) The biosynthesis of carotenes. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 97: 520-528.

PRENTICE HC (1978) Experimental taxonomy of Silene section Elisanthe (Caryophyllaceae):

crossing experiments. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 77: 203-216.

PRENTICE HC (1979) Numerical analysis of infraspecific variation in European Silene alba and S.

dioica (Caryophyllaceae). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 78: 181-212.

PRENTICE HC, O MASTENBROEK, W BERENDSEN and P HOGEWEG (1984) Geographic variation in the pollen of Silene latifolia (S. alba, S. pratensis): a quantitative morphological analysis of population data. Canadian Journal of Botany 62: 1259-1267.

PURRINGTON CB and J SCHMITT (1998) Consequences of sexually dimorphic timing of emergence and flowering in Silene latifolia. Journal of Ecology 86: 397-404.

RAYMOND M and F ROUSSET (1995) GENEPOP (version 1.2): population genetics software for exact tests and ecumenicism. Journal of Heredity 86: 248-249.

REAL LA and P MCELHANY (1996) Spatial pattern and process in plant-pathogen interactions.

Ecology 77: 1011-1025.

RICE WR and GW SALT (1990) The evolution of reproductive isolation as a correlated character under sympatric conditions: experimental evidence. Evolution 44: 1140-1152.

RICE WR and EE HOSTERT (1993) Laboratory experiments on speciation: what have we learned in 40 years? Evolution 47: 1637-1653.

RICO C, I RICO and G HEWITT (1996) 470 million years of conservation of microsatellite loci among fish species. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 263: 549-557.

RIDLEY M (1993) Evolution. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston.

ROCHE BM, HM ALEXANDER and AD MALTBY (1995) Dispersal and disease gradients of anther smut infection of Silene alba at different life stages. Ecology 76: 1863-1871.

ROY BA (1994) The use and abuse of pollinators by fungi. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 9: 335 339.

RUDDAT M and JM KOKONTIS (1988) Chapter 18;

Host-parasite recognition in Ustilago violacea Silene alba, pp. 275-292 in Eukaryote cell recognition: concepts and model systems, edited by GP Chapman, CC Ainsworth and CJ Chatham. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

SANSOME E, CM BRASIER and FW SANSOME (1979) Further cytological studies on the L and S types of Phytophtera from cocoa. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 73: 293 302.

SCHLIEWEN UK, D TAUTZ and S PBO (1994) Sympatric speciation suggested by monophyly of crater lake cichlids. Nature 368: 629-632.

SCHMITT J (1983) Flowering plant density and pollinator visitation in Senecio. Oecologia 60: 97 102.

SCHNEIDER S, D ROESSLI and L EXCOFFIER (2000) Arlequin ver. 2.000: A software for population genetics analysis., pp. Genetics and Biometry Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland, Geneva.

SCUTT CP, Y LI, SE ROBERTSON, ME WILLIS and PM GILMARTIN (1997) Sex determination in dioecious Silene latifolia;

effects of the Y chromosome and the parasitic smut fungus (Ustilago violacea) on gene expression during flower development. Plant Physiology 114:

969-979.

SHEARER CA (1995) Fungal competition. Can. J. Bot. 73: S1259-S1264.

SHYKOFF JA, and E BUCHELI (1995) Pollinator visitation patterns, floral rewards and the probability of transmission of Microbotryum violaceum, a venereal disease of plants. Journal of Ecology 83: 189-198.

SHYKOFF JA and O KALTZ (1998) Phenotypic changes in host plants diseased by Microbotryum violaceum: parasite manipulation, side effects, and trade-offs. International Journal of Plant Sciences 159: 236-243.

SHYKOFF JA, A MEYHOFER and E BUCHELI (1999) Genetic isolation among host races of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum on three host species. International Journal of Plant Sciences 160: 907-916.

SLATKIN M (1995) A measure of population subdivision based on microsatellite allele frequency.

Genetics 139: 457-462.

SNETSELAAR K, M BLKER and R KAHMANN (1996) Ustilago maydis mating hyphae orient their growth toward pheromone sources. Fungal genetics and biology 20: 299-312.

SOKAL RR and FJ ROHLF (1995) Biometry. W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, NY USA.

SOWIG P (1989) Effects of flowering plants patch size on species composition of pollinator communities, foraging strategies, and resource partitioning in bumblebees (Hymenoptera:

Apidae). Oecologia 78: 550-558.

SPENCER JL and HE WHITE (1951) Anther smut of carnation. Phytopathology 41: 291-299.

STALEY JT and NR KRIEG (1984) Classification of prokaryotic microorganisms. An overview., pp.

1-4 in Bergeys manual of systematic bacteriology., edited by N. R. Krieg and J. G. Holt.

Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore MD, USA.

STOKES ME, CS DAVIS and GG KOCH (2000) Categorical data analysis using the SAS System.

SAS Institute Inc., Cary NC, USA.

STOUT JC (2000) Does size matter? Bumblebee behaviour and the pollination of Cytisus scoparius L.

(Fabaceae). Apidologie 31: 129-139.

STRAND M, TA PROLLA, RM LISKAY and TD PETES (1993) Destabilization of tracts of simple repetitive DNA in yeast by mutation affecting DNA mismatch repair. Nature 365: 274-276.

SU G, SO SUH, RW SCHNEIDER and JS RUSSIN (2001) Host specialization in the charcoal rot fungs, Macrophomina phaseolina. Phytopathology 91: 120-126.

SWOFFORD DL and RB SELANDER (1987) Biosys-I, a FORTRAN program for the comprehensive analysis for electrophoretic data in population genetics and systematic analysis of allelic variation in genetics. Users manual. Journal of Heredity 72: 281-283.

TAUBER CA and MJ TAUBER (1989) Sympatric speciation in insects: perception and perspective, pp. 307-344 in Speciation and its consequences, edited by D Otte and JA Endler. Sinauer Associates Inc., Sunderland MA.

TAUTZ D (1989) Hypervariability of simple sequences as a general source for polymorphic DNA markers. Nucleic Acids Research 17: 6473-6471.

TAYLOR DR (1993) Sex ratio in hybrids between Silene alba and Silene dioica : evidence for Y linked restorers. Heredity 74: 518-526.

TAYLOR DR (1994) The genetic basis of sex ratio in Silene alba (= S. latifolia ). Genetics 136: 641 651.

TAYLOR DR (1999) Genetics of sex ratio variation among natural populations of a dioecious plant.

Evolution 53: 55-62.

THOMSON JD (1981) Spatial and temporal components of resource assessment by flower-feeding insects. Journal of Animal Ecology 50: 49-59.

THOMSON JD, MV PRICE, NM WASER and D STRATTON (1986) Comparative studies of pollen and fluorescent dye transport by bumble bees visiting Erythronium grandiflorum. Oecologia 69: 561-566.

THRALL PH, A BIERE and J ANTONOVICS (1993) Plant life-history and disease susceptibility - the occurrence of Ustilago violacea on different species within the Caryophyllaceae. Journal of Ecology 81: 489-498.

THRALL PH and AM JAROSZ (1994) Host-pathogen dynamics in experimental populations of Silene alba and Ustilago violacea. I. Ecological and genetic determinants of disease spread. Journal of Ecology 82: 549-559.

THRALL PH and J ANTONOVICS (1995) Theoretical and empirical studies of metapopulations:

population and genetic dynamics of the Silene - Ustilago system. Canadian Journal of Botany 73: S1249-S1258.

THRALL PH and JJ BURDON (1997) Host-pathogen dynamics in a metapopulation context: the ecological and evolutionary consequences of being spatial. Journal of Ecology 85: 743-753.

UTELLI A and BA ROY (2000) Pollinator abundance and behavior on Aconitum lycotonum (Ranunculaceae): an analysis of the quantity and quality components of pollination. OIKOS 89: 461-470.

UTELLI A and BA ROY (2001) Causes and consequences of floral damage in Aconitum lycoctonum at high and low elevations in Switzerland. Oecologia 127: 266-273.

VAN BAALEN M and MW SABELIS (1995) The dynamics of multiple infections and the evolution of virulence. American Naturalist 146: 881-910.

VAN ZANDT PA and S MOPPER (1998) A meta-analysis of adaptive deme formation in phytophagous insect populations. American Naturalist 152: 595-604.

VAUGNTON G and M RAMSEY (1998) Floral display, pollinator visitation and reproductive success in the dioecious perennial herb Wurmbea dioica (Liliaceae). Oecologia 115: 93-101.

VNKY K (1994) European Smut Fungi. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart.

VIA S (1999) Reproductive isolation between sympatric races of pea aphids. I. Gene flow restriction and habitat choice. Evolution 53: 1446-1457.

VIA S, AC BOUCK and S SKILLMAN (2000) Reproductive isolation between divergent races of pea aphids on two hosts. II. Selection against migrants and hybrids in the parental environments.

Evolution 54: 1626-1637.

WADDINGTON KD (1981) Factors influencing pollen flow in bumblebee-pollinated Delphinium virescens. OIKOS 37: 153-159.

WALSH BJ (1867) The apple-worm and the apple maggot. Journal of Horticultural Science 2: 338 343.

WASER NM and MV PRICE (1982) A comparison of pollen and fluorescent dye carry-over by natural pollinators of Ipomopsis aggregata (Polemoniaceae). Ecology 63: 1168-1172.

WASER NM (1986) Flower constancy;

definition, cause, and measurement. American Naturalist 127:

593-603.

WEIR BS and CC COCKERHAM (1984) Estimating F-statistics for the analysis of population structure. Evolution 38: 1358-1370.

WEIR BS (1996) Genetic Data Analysis II: Methods for Discrete Population Genetic Data. Sinauer Associates Inc., Sunderland MA.

WESTERBERGH A and A SAURA (1994) Gene flow and pollinator behaviour in Silene dioica populations. OIKOS 71: 215-224.

WESTERGAARD M (1940) Studies on the cytology and sex determination in polyploid forms of Melandrium album. Dansk Botanisk Arkiv 10: 1-131.

WESTERGAARD M (1958) The mechanism of sex determination in dioecious flowering plants.

Advances in Genetics 9: 217-281.

WILLIAMS DA (1982) Extra-Binomial variation in logistic linear models. Applied Statistics 31: 144 148.

WILLMOT A and PD MOORE (1973) Adaptation to light intensity in Silene alba and S. dioica.

OIKOS 24: 458-464.

WILLSON MF and RI BERTIN (1979) Flower-visitors, nectar production, and inflorescence size of Asclepias syriaca. Canadian Journal of Botany 57: 1380-1388.

WIROOKS L and K PLASSMANN (1999) Nahrungskologie, Phnologie und Biotopbindung einiger an Nelkengewchsen lebender Nachtfalterraupen unter besonderer Bercksichtigung der Nahrungskonkurrenz. Melanargia 11: 93-115.

WRIGHT S (1931) Evolution in mendelian populations. Genetics 16: 97-159.

WRIGHT S (1951) The genetical structure of populations. Annals of Eugenics 15: 323-354.

WYTTENBACH A, Y NARAIN and K FREDGA (1999) Genetic structuring and gene flow in a hybrid zone between two chromosome races of the common shrew (Sorex araneus, Insectavora) revealed by microsatellites. Heredity 82: 79-88.

ZARDOYA R, DM VOLLMER, C CRADDOCK, JT STREELMAN, S KARL et al. (1996) Evolutionary conservation of microsatellite flanking regions and their use in resolving the phylogeny of cichlid fish (Pisces: Perciformes). Proceeding of the Royal Society of London Series B 263:

1589-1598.

ZILLIG H (1921) ber spezialisierte Formen beim Antherenbrand, Ustilago violacea (Pers.) Fuck.

Zentralblatt fr Bakteriologie und Parasitenkunde 53: 33-74.

ZOGG H (1985) Brandpilze Mitteleuropas. Cryptogamica Helvetica 16: 1-277.

ZWETKO P and HW PFEIFHOFER (1991) Carotene analysis of rust spores - significance for physiology and taxonomy. Nova Hedwigia 52: 251-266.

Theoretical models have shown that host race formation in plant parasite systems may eventually lead to speciation in sympatric populations of hosts under ecologically realistic conditions (e.g. Dieckmann and Doebeli 1999). The empirical evidence for this however is scarce, and predominantly concerned with phytophagous insect model systems. This thesis presents one of the first ecological studies that investigate host race differentiation of a plant pathogenic fungus in host sympatry.

As a model system, we have used the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum, a pathogen that obligatory parasitises susceptible members of the Caryophyllaceae plant family to complete its sexual cycle, thereby sterilizing the host plant. We have studied this fungus in populations of two of its host species, Silene latifolia, the white campion, a dioecious short-lived perennial from open, disturbed habitats such as borders of arable land, and S. dioica, the red campion, a closely related dioecious perennial that mainly occurs in more shady humid habitats such as woodland borders. This fungus is known to infect 10-67% of the hosts in natural populations of these host species. Spores are produced in the anthers of the host plant.

An infection of a female plant causes a morphological sex change in which the ovaries are reduced and staminal rudiments develop into stamens that bear spore-filled anthers. Spores are transmitted by the natural pollinators of their host species, which act as vectors of this disease.

Fungal isolates from allopatric populations of these host species have previously shown to be differentiated. In sympatric populations of hosts some gene flow is expected, which would act to homogenize the differentiation. On the other hand, if spores from one host species are deposited on the alien host species, this may result in such fitness penalties for the pathogen (i.e. secondary reinforcement, Ridley 1993 p. 413) that differentiation is maintained, or can even be increased. Aim of this study was to investigate host-specific differentiation between fungal isolates from S. latifolia and S. dioica as they appear in allopatric, parapatric and sympatric populations of these host species, in the evolutionary context of host race formation and speciation.

We have found that between fungal isolates from four allopatric host populations of S. latifolia and S. dioica divergence was pronounced, and revealed clear and distinct host races for these host species (Chapter 2). In nearly all of the sympatric and parapatric populations that were examined, except for one host population in which both host species grew truly intermingled, we found significant population subdivision with respect to host species as well, exhibiting high values of FST and RST. Genetically, fungal isolates from interspecific hybrid hosts resembled isolates from S. latifolia more than isolates from S. dioica. Furthermore, the degree of host sympatry to some extent determined the level of gene flow between samples isolated from the different host categories, and thereby the level of genetic differentiation between the host races. The level of variation among isolates from each of the host species was significantly higher in sympatric/parapatric than in allopatric populations. Also, observed levels of heterozygosity were significantly lower than expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, confirming the selfing nature of this fungus. The overall levels of heterozygosity were found to be significantly lower in samples from S. dioica than in samples from S. latifolia. The observed host-related genetic differentiation among these geographically spread populations suggest a long term divergence between these host races of M. violaceum that most likely has evolved in allopatry. In sympatric host populations, both host races presumably come into secondary contact with each other, and host-specific alleles are exchanged depending on the degree of sympatry in the population.

I We have shown that there was an effect of host spatial structure on the genetic structure of anther smuts in a sympatric population of these host species (Chapter 3).

For one of the sporidial colony color loci (SCC), divergence among fungal isolates from S. latifolia and S. dioica was significantly smaller relative to allopatric populations of hosts. Fungal isolates from allopatric populations of S. latifolia are almost fixed for the wild type pink allele, and isolates from S. dioica are almost fixed for the yellow allele. However, in contrast to the previous study using microsatellite loci (in which FST and RST were not significantly different from zero), convergence between both host races in sympatry was far from complete. Among fungal isolates from S. dioica, the frequency of their native yellow allele was 56%, but among isolates from S. latifolia, their native pink allele was close to fixation, as in allopatric populations. The local host structure, consisting of patches that are mostly dominated by either S. dioica, or by S. latifolia, had a weakly significant impact on the SCC allele frequencies. This suggested that the anther smut population could be divided into a local deme structure, in which selection and migration might be balanced in such a way that the overall variation in this SCC locus is maintained. A closer look at the microsatellite genotypes from chapter 2 showed that the more rare alleles were not randomly distributed over the population either, supporting the hypothesis that the patchiness of the host population shapes the genetic structure of the pathogen.

Intraspecific competition and mating experiments between strains of the anther smut from both host species were performed to investigate the competitive ability of strains and assortative mating (Chapter 4). It was shown that, in general, strains isolated from S. latifolia outcompeted strains isolated from S. dioica on both host species (Chapter 4). In female hosts, heterotypic dikaryons had the largest competition success. Furthermore, latency period was significantly shorter in infections that contained strains from S. latifolia, compared to homokaryotic infections with a S.

dioica origin. Strains from S. latifolia conjugated in much higher frequencies than strains from S. dioica. A significant positive correlation was detected between the relative success rate of strains in competition and in conjugation, suggesting that success of a strain in competition might be partly determined by its swiftness of mating. In addition, reciprocal differences between homotypic and heterotypic crosses revealed a significant effect of fungal mating type, with mating type a1 having a dominant effect on the rate of conjugation.

The role of vectors in effectuating positive assortative mating between strains from the two host species by host fidelity of insect vectors was investigated in a set of experiments in which fluorescent dye was used to trace vector movements over artificial, and fully mixed plots of S. latifolia and S. dioica (Chapter 5). Different pollinator guilds, mainly bumblebees were recorded to visit S. dioica diurnally, and noctuid moths were recorded to visit S. latifolia nocturnally. Moreover, both guilds were found to be loyal to their preferred host. Mean rates of interspecific transfer after 24h from S. latifolia to S. dioica were 26%. From S. dioica to S. dioica interspecific transfer was 34%. These estimates probably represent the absolute maximum of interspecific visitation between these host species, since natural sympatric populations of these host species have found to be spatially and temporally more heterogeneous.

Therefore, the observed visitation pattern of pollinators/vectors might contribute to the maintenance of genetically differentiated host races of the anther smut M. violaceum that were observed in sympatric and parapatric populations of these host species.

Furthermore, male hosts were found to be preferentially visited over female hosts. In addition non-linear regression analysis suggested that the range in which the teliospores can be transmitted is probably larger (20-50+m) than the actual infection range (not much larger than 12-13m) of this venereal disease within a single flowering season.

In this thesis special attention is paid to fungal isolates from S. latifolia and S.

dioica in sympatry, and we have seen that fungal isolates from different host species in sympatry were less differentiated than in allopatry, that the host race from S.

latifolia outcompeted the race from S. dioica, and that spatial (and temporal) structure of host plants and host fidelity of vectors contributed to reproductive isolation between both fungal races in sympatry, although this was far from complete. Since sympatric host race formation was one of the starting points of this study, we still have to answer the question to what extent our data provides evidence for the occurrence of this phenomenon in our model system. In an optimistic scenario, following the sympatric host race formation model of Berlocher (1998a), our model system seems to fit a stage 2 model, in which the races are isolated only by host fidelity with allele frequency differences between the host races. We did detect host-specific alleles (in the microsatellite loci;

Chapter 2), yet these were most apparent in more parapatric and allopatric populations of hosts, and not in the true sympatric population. Since there was also no evidence for any mechanism of pre- and/or postzygotic reproductive isolation that is unrelated to host fidelity whatsoever, we can safely conclude that this system has not reached stage 3 yet. However, the most obvious critic to this would be that a much more likely explanation for the evolution of these host races is a more classic allopatric model, in which populations are geographically separated and evolve independent from each other. Especially the strong fitness differences between strains from different host species that we have observed in chapter 4, but also the observations that similar (selectively neutral) genetic variation between the host races is widespread (Chapter 2), and that true sympatric populations of these host species infected with this anther smut are probably not so widespread, makes a more geographical model of host race formation much more feasible (i.e. sympatric host race formation much less feasible) in this model system.

TTI Theoretische modellen hebben aangetoond dat waardrasvorming in systemen van plantparasieten kunnen leiden tot soortsvorming in gemengde populaties van gastheren onder ecologisch realistische omstandigheden (zie bijv. Dieckmann en Doebeli 1999). Er zijn echter maar weinig voorbeelden van studies die dit hebben laten zien in natuurlijke systemen, en de studies die er zijn, gaan voornamelijk over plantenetende insecten. Dit proefschrift is een van de eerste ecologische studies naar gastheerrassen en waardrasvorming van een schimmelziekte van planten in gemengde populaties van verscheidene gastheersoorten.

Als modelsysteem hebben we de brandschimmel Microbotryum violaceum gebruikt, een schimmel die obligaat planten uit de familie der Anjerachtigen parasiteert om zich op deze wijze seksueel te kunnen voortplanten. Dit is een proces waarbij de gastheerplant steriel wordt. We hebben deze schimmel bestudeerd in natuurlijke populaties van Silene latifolia, de avondkoekoeksbloem, een tweehuizige, kortlevend-meerjarige plant die voorkomt in open, verstoorde leefmilieus zoals aan de randen van landbouwgronden, en S. dioica, de dagkoekoeksbloem, een sterk verwante, eveneens tweehuizige meerjarige plant die voorkomt in meer beschaduwde, vochtige leefmilieus zoals aan de randen van bebossing. Deze schimmel kan wel 10 67% (gemiddeld zon 25%) van de planten infecteren in natuurlijke populaties van deze gastheersoorten. Schimmelsporen worden geproduceerd in de helmhokjes van hun gastheren. Een infectie van een vrouwelijke gastheer (een gastvrouw) veroorzaakt een morfologische geslachtsverandering van de plant, waarbij de vruchtbeginsels sterk worden gereduceerd en de in beginsel bij beide seksen aanwezige helmdraden zich ontwikkelen tot volgroeide helmdraden, die met schimmelsporen gevulde helmhokjes bevatten. Schimmelsporen worden verspreid door de natuurlijke bestuivers van hun gastheren, die daardoor voor de schimmel functioneren als vectoren. Dit maakt deze plantenziekte in zekere zin tot een seksueel overdraagbare aandoening van planten.

Tussen schimmelisolaten uit populaties van gastheerplanten waar slechts een van de mogelijke plantensoorten groeit, bestaan grote genetische verschillen die specifiek zijn voor de plantensoort waarin zij groeien. We verwachtten dat er in gemengde populaties van deze gastheersoorten uitwisseling van genetisch materiaal zou kunnen zijn, die de genetische verschillen tussen de schimmelisolaten van verschillende plantensoorten zou kunnen opheffen. Maar, als schimmelsporen in zulke populaties terechtkomen op de voor hun vreemde plantensoort, zou dit ook kunnen leiden tot sterk verminderde overleving op deze plantensoort, waardoor de verschillen zullen blijven gehandhaafd, of zelfs nog zouden kunnen worden vergroot. Het doel van deze studie was om deze gastheersoort-kenmerkende verschillen tussen schimmelisolaten van avond- en dagkoekoeksbloemen te onderzoeken in populaties waarin beide plantensoorten in verschillende mate zijn gemengd, in een evolutionair kader van waardras- en soortsvorming. Daartoe onderscheiden we drie typen gastheerpopulaties;

(1) echt gemengde populaties van beide plantensoorten (sympatrisch), (2) populaties waar beide plantensoorten aangrenzend voorkomen (parapatrisch), en (3) populaties waar maar een van beide plantensoorten voorkomt binnen een straal van enkele kilometers (allopatrisch).

We hebben gevonden dat tussen schimmelisolaten uit vier allopatrische populaties van gastheren de genetische verschillen tussen de isolaten van verschillende gastheren erg groot waren voor een aantal selectief neutrale genetische merkers (in dit geval microsatellieten, stukjes repeterend DNA die op veel plaatsen in het DNA voorkomen, en die opmerkelijk veel variatie vertonen die veelal niet voor- of nadelig is voor het organisme). Dit bevestigde dat we op grond van de genetische verschillen met recht kunnen spreken van verschillende gastheerrassen voor de brandschimmels van beide soorten planten (Hoofdstuk 2). In bijna alle sympatrische en parapatrische populaties van planten die wij onderzochten, behalve in n populatie waarin beide plantensoorten op korte afstand van elkaar, en echt door elkaar groeiden, vonden we eveneens genetische verschillen met betrekking tot gastheersoort, die echter afnam met de mate van menging van beide gastheersoorten. Gezien hun genetische samenstelling, leken de schimmels die werden gesoleerd uit hybride planten (dit zijn kruisingen tussen avond- en dagkoekoeksbloemen) meer op de schimmels die waren gesoleerd uit de avondkoekoeksbloem dan op de schimmels die waren gesoleerd uit de dagkoekoeksbloem. Tevens was de mate van heterozygotie (dit is de mate waarin binnen een individu verschillende vormen van een gen voorkomen in het DNA (maximaal twee in een diplod organisme)) veel lager dan zou kunnen worden verwacht op grond van de hoeveelheid genetische variatie die in een populatie aanwezig was. Hiermee werd nog eens bevestigd dat deze schimmel zich voornamelijk door zelfbevruchting voortplant, iets dat al bekend was uit andere studies over deze schimmel. De mate van heterozygotie in schimmelisolaten uit dagkoekoeksbloemen was lager dan in isolaten uit avondkoekoeksbloemen.

We hebben deze gastheerspecifieke genetische verschillen tussen isolaten uit de beide gastheren gevonden in een aantal populaties, die geografisch gezien nogal ver uit elkaar liggen. Dit deed ons vermoeden dat deze verschillen tussen de gastheerrassen reeds lange tijd zouden kunnen bestaan, en dat deze rassen het meest waarschijnlijk zijn ontstaan in allopatrische populaties, de populaties van planten van maar n gastheersoort. We veronderstellen dat in de meer gemengde populaties van de twee gastheersoorten de beide gastheerrassen opnieuw met elkaar in contact komen, nadat ze eerst in allopatrische populaties genetisch uit elkaar zijn gegroeid. In deze meer gemengde populaties kunnen dan de gastheerspecifieke allelen (dit zijn vormen van een gen, of van een specifieke plaats in het DNA van een individu) worden uitgewisseld, wat afhankelijk lijkt te zijn van de mate van menging.

We tonen aan dat de ruimtelijke structuur van de gastheerpopulatie een effect heeft op de genetische structuur van de schimmelpopulatie (Hoofdstuk 3). Van een bepaald gen, dat een rol speelt bij synthese van btacaroteen, een molecuul dat bijvoorbeeld kleur geeft aan tomaten en wortels en een rol speelt bij de synthese van vitamine A (retinol) in mensen, bestaan in deze schimmel verscheidene vormen.

Schimmelisolaten uit allopatrische gastheerpopulaties van avondkoekoeksbloemen, kleuren bijna allemaal roze wanneer deze groeien op een kunstmatig voedingsmedium in een plastic schaaltje, terwijl schimmelisolaten uit allopatrische gastheerpopulaties van dagkoekoeksbloemen bijna allemaal geel kleuren. Echter, in tegenstelling tot hetgeen we zagen met betrekking tot de genetische verschillen in selectief neutrale merkers waar er bijna geen verschillen meer waren tussen schimmelisolaten van verschillende gastheren in de meest gemengde populatie van gastheren, zien we voor deze kleurmerker nog wel gastheerspecifieke variatie. Isolaten van avondkoekoeksbloemen waren weliswaar nog steeds bijna helemaal roze, maar grofweg de ene helft van de isolaten van dagkoekoeksbloemen bleek roze, de andere helft geel. De locale ruimtelijke structuur van gastheerplanten, bestaand uit groepjes planten met voornamelijk avondkoekoeksbloemen en groepjes planten met voornamelijk dagkoekoeksbloemen, bleek van invloed op de genetische structuur van schimmelisolaten. Isolaten afkomstig uit dagkoekoeksbloemen waren meer geel in groepjes planten met voornamelijk dagkoekoeksbloemen dan in groepjes met voornamelijk avondkoekoeksbloemen. Omgekeerd, schimmelisolaten afkomstig uit avondkoekoeksbloemen waren meer roze in groepjes met voornamelijk avondkoekoeksbloemen dan in groepjes met voornamelijk dagkoekoeksbloemen.

Hieruit kunnen we concluderen dat de totale populatie schimmels waarschijnlijk niet bestaat uit n grote panmictische populatie waarbinnen paring tussen individuele schimmelstammen willekeurig plaatsvindt, maar uit een aantal kleinere subpopulaties die ieder worden gevormd door een groepje gastheerplanten die bij elkaar staan.

Binnen deze subpopulaties wisselen brandschimmels frequent genetische informatie uit door kruising, maar tussen deze sub populaties gebeurt dit veel minder. De variatie in selectief neutrale merkers uit hoofdstuk 2 is in deze populatie van gastheren tevens in kaart gebracht, waarbij duidelijk werd dat de verdeling van allelen niet geheel willekeurig was. Dit ondersteunt de hypothese dat de genetische structuur van deze schimmels wordt benvloed door de ruimtelijke structuur van deze twee gastheersoorten.

We hebben competitie- en kruisingsexperimenten tussen schimmelstammen van beide gastheersoorten uitgevoerd, om te onderzoeken of kruisingen tussen stammen afkomstig van dezelfde gastheersoort wellicht hun eigen plantensoort beter kunnen infecteren dan kruisingen tussen stammen afkomstig van verschillende gastheersoorten (Hoofdstuk 4). De resultaten hiervan zijn dat in het algemeen de stammen afkomstig van avondkoekoeksbloemen het veel beter doen in competitie dan de stammen afkomstig van dagkoekoeksbloemen, ongeacht op welke gastheersoort zij zich bevonden. Verder zien we dat kruisingen waarbij stammen afkomstig van avondkoekoeksbloemen bij betrokken zijn in veel hogere frequenties tot paring blijken te komen in n etmaal, dan kruisingen met stammen die louter afkomstig zijn van dagkoekoeksbloemen. Dit suggereert dat het paringsproces tussen stammen afkomstig van avondkoekoeksbloemen wellicht veel sneller verloopt dan tussen stammen afkomstig van dagkoekoeksbloemen. Echter, in competitie in vrouwelijke gastheren, doen kruisingen tussen stammen afkomstig van verschillende gastheersoorten het juist beter dan kruisingen tussen stammen van dezelfde gastheersoort, iets dat voornamelijk in avondkoekoeksbloemen naar voren komt. De latentietijd (dit is de tijd tussen het in contact komen van de schimmel met de plant tot aan het produceren van een nieuwe generatie schimmelsporen) is tevens veel langer voor schimmelstammen afkomstig van dagkoekoeksbloemen, ongeacht de gastheersoort. Er blijkt een verband te bestaan tussen de snelheid van paring van een schimmelstam in het paringsexperiment en zijn succes in het competitie-experiment. Dit suggereert dat het succes van een stam in competitie grotendeels zou kunnen worden verklaard door zijn snelheid van paren. Dit grote verschil in competitieve sterkte tussen stammen impliceert eveneens, dat als er veel uitwisseling zou bestaan tussen stammen van beide gastheren in gemengde populaties van beide gastheersoorten, de gastheerspecifieke genetische variatie van dagkoekoeksbloemen wel eens snel zou kunnen verdwijnen.

Deze schimmel wordt verspreid door de natuurlijke bestuivers van zijn gastheren, wat deze schimmelziekte in wezen maakt tot een seksueel overdraagbare aandoening van planten. Gastheergetrouwheid van deze bestuivers, of vectoren, kunnen een belangrijke rol spelen bij het genetisch verschillend zijn van schimmelisolaten van verschillende gastheersoorten, en de handhaving hiervan. Dit is onderzocht in een aantal experimenten waarbij beide gastheren kunstmatig door elkaar zijn gezet, en waarin met fluorescerend poeder de bewegingen van bestuivers / vectoren is gevolgd gedurende een etmaal, of gedurende de dag (Hoofdstuk 5). Het blijkt dat beide gastheersoorten hun eigen bestuiversgilde kennen, bestaand uit nachtvlinders (in het bijzonder nachtuiltjes) die in de schemer (en in minder mate ook s nachts) voornamelijk avondkoekoeksbloemen bezoeken, en bestaand uit hommels en zweefvliegen die overdag voornamelijk dagkoekoeksbloemen bezoeken.

Bovendien blijken deze vectoren vrij kieskeurig in het bezoeken van beide plantensoorten, zelfs als deze volledig door elkaar staan zoals in onze experimenten.

Het aantal bezoeken tussen gastheersoorten was echter nog wel dusdanig hoog, zon 26% van avondkoekoeksbloemen naar dagkoekoeksbloemen en zon 34% in de tegengestelde richting, dat dit op zichzelf niet verklaart waarom schimmelstammen met het voor dagkoekoeksbloemen kenmerkende genetische profiel nog bestaan in gemengde populaties, noch waarom stammen afkomstig van beide gastheersoorten in gemengde populaties genetisch nog van elkaar verschillen. Natuurlijke gemengde populaties van beide gastheersoorten blijken echter niet zo mooi homogeen gemengd als in deze experimenten, maar zijn gestructureerd, zowel ruimtelijk (Hoofdstuk 3) als in de tijd. Er bestaan namelijk verschillen in bloeitijd tussen beide gastheersoorten, en ook tussen beide gastheergeslachten, waarbij dagkoekoeksbloemen eerder bloeien dan avondkoekoeksbloemen, en mannelijke planten eerder en langer dan vrouwelijke.

Hierdoor verwachten we dat in dergelijke populaties het aantal bezoeken tussen de gastheersoorten veel kleiner is dan werd geschat in deze experimenten, en is wellicht klein genoeg om beide schimmelisolaten effectief gescheiden te houden. Hierdoor zouden gastheerspecifieke genetische verschillen kunnen blijven gehandhaafd.

In dit proefschrift wordt de meeste aandacht besteed aan schimmelisolaten afkomstig uit avondkoekoeksbloemen en dagkoekoeksbloemen in gemengde populaties van gastheren. We hebben gezien dat schimmelisolaten afkomstig uit verschillende gastheersoorten in gemengde populaties genetisch minder van elkaar verschillen dan in allopatrisch populaties, dat de schimmelstammen afkomstig van avondkoekoeksbloemen competitief beter presteren dan schimmelstammen van dagkoekoeksbloemen, en dat de ruimtelijke (en de temporele) structuur van gastheer populaties en de gastheergetrouwheid van vectoren bijdragen aan de reproductieve isolatie tussen beide gastheerrassen, al blijkt dit laatste verre van volledig. Een van de oorspronkelijke doelstellingen van deze studie was het onderzoeken van waardrasvorming in gemengde populaties van gastheren. We hebben echter nog niet beantwoord in welke mate de verkregen data nu aanwijzingen leveren voor het voorkomen van dit fenomeen in dit modelsysteem. In een optimistisch scenario, het vier-stappenplan voor sympatrische waardrasvorming van Berlocher (1998a) volgend, zou ons modelsysteem een plaats kunnen krijgen in stap 2. In deze fase zijn beide waardrassen gescheiden door getrouwheid van vectoren (Hoofdstuk 5), en bestaan er genetische verschillen tussen de rassen, inclusief het bestaan van voor het gastheerras kenmerkende allelen (Hoofdstukken 2 en 3). Deze verschillen worden echter voornamelijk gevonden in de meer parapatrische (minder gemengde) populaties van gastheerplanten, en niet in de echt gemengde natuurlijke populatie. Vanwege het feit dat we ook geen mechanismen hebben kunnen aantonen die bijvoorbeeld het kruisen van beide rassen onmogelijk zouden maken, die anders zijn dan de getrouwheid van vectoren, bevindt de waardrasvorming zich zeker niet in een volgende fase volgens dit stappenplan. De meest voor de hand liggende kritiek op bovenstaand scenario is echter dat het ontstaan van deze waardrassen veel eenvoudiger is te bewerkstelligen in allopatrie. Zeker gezien de grote verschillen in competitieve sterkte van beide gastheerrassen (Hoofdstuk 4), en de wijdverbreide variatie in selectief neutrale microsatelliet merkers, waarbij steeds dezelfde allelen worden gevonden voor elk van de beide gastheersoorten in geografisch nogal verspreide populaties in West Europa (Hoofdstuk 2), terwijl genfecteerde, gemengde populaties van beide gastheersoorten helemaal niet zo wijdverbreid zijn. Dit maakt een meer geografisch gescheiden model voor de evolutie van deze gastheerrassen in dit modelsysteem aannemelijker.

T Eindelijk! De klus is geklaard, mijn proefschrift is af! Na vier jaar en tien maanden is het punt gekomen dat ik deze slotwoorden kan gaan schrijven. Promoveren is een eenzaam tijdverdrijf. Toch zijn er een groot aantal mensen medeverantwoordelijk voor dit proefschrift in zijn huidige vorm.

Graag wil ik dan ook de volgende mensen bedanken: allereerst natuurlijk Arjen, jij hebt mij dusdanig vrij gelaten in mijn keuzes dat ik uiteindelijk het gevoel heb dat dit echt mijn proefschrift is geworden. Toch vermoed ik, dat je op de achtergrond altijd de hoofdlijnen goed in de gaten hebt gehouden. Ik wil je zeker bedanken voor het feit dat je altijd een uurtje vrij kon maken als ik dat nodig achtte, of als experimenten of resultaten dat vereisten. Dit laatste geldt zeker ook voor Jos. Jij was ook altijd oprecht genteresseerd, ook al heb ik vaak moeten uitleggen dat ik in dit modelsysteem vanuit de schimmel werkte en niet vanuit de plant. Daarnaast ben ik je ook erg dankbaar voor de gesprekken die wij hadden over andere zaken dan wetenschap. Je houdt nog steeds een goede pot schaken tegoed!

Zeker niet minder belangrijk is het contact met mede-AIOs en OIOs geweest, met name mijn kamergenoten van kamer 235;

de beste plaats van het gebouw. Marret, je hebt mij in het begin veel geleerd over het reilen en zeilen op het NIOO, je leerde me mijn eerste stapjes in SAS, en maakte dat ik mij in Heteren erg snel thuis voelde. De lege plaats die ontstond, nadat jij promoveerde werd gelukkig al snel opgevolgd door een nieuwe Nijmegenaar. Koen, ik hoop dat uit jouw taak als een van mijn paranimfen genoeg waardering uitstraalt voor alle vrolijke uurtjes. We hebben naast de vele discussies over experimenten, resultaten, toveren met Excel, pijlgifkikkers, cartoons (Gary Larson en Fokke & Sukke), goede muziek (Nick Cave;

pretentieuze zak!) en niet te vergeten over wie er nou ook alweer het sterkst is met tafeltennissen (met blikjes!), vooral altijd erg veel lol gehad, en ik hoop dat ik je toch zodanig heb kunnen stimuleren dat jouw proefschrift, ondanks het vele tel- en weegwerk dat nog op de stapel ligt, ook niet lang meer op zich zal laten wachten.

Geen van mijn experimenten werd uitgevoerd zonder de hulp en kritische blikken van Sonja (praktische haalbaarheid van experimenten, veld- en schimmelwerk), Gregor (groene vingers, kas- en tuinexperimenten), Christa en Tanja (moleculair werk en allerhande NIOO-nieuwtjes) en verder Quiny, Maria, Slavica en Hans T. Helaas heb ik in vier jaar nooit een eigen student gehad om te begeleiden. Niettemin kwam op de valreep Annemieke mijn dataset uitbreiden, zodat wij samen uit haar data en hoofdstuk 2 een goede publicatie kunnen gaan schrijven. Alvast dank hiervoor!

Naast mijn kamergenoten hebben de meeste AIOs, OIOs, studenten, postdocs, assistenten en vaste staf het verblijf in Heteren vergemakkelijkt. Iedereen op het NIOO hartelijk dank voor de immer aangename sfeer, met name;

Frank, Ineke, Olga, Anita, Christel, Leonard, Rinse, George, Wietse, Douwe, Agata, Saskia, Kees, Niels, Marije, Hamida, Tracey, Gerard, Ivonne, Kitty, Peter van D, Peter van T, Gerlinde, Pella, David, Anna, en natuurlijk SMS-vriendin Leontien en playstation Tobi. Twee personen wil ik in het bijzonder nog even noemen;

Jelmer, ook al ben je soms erg onstuimig, toch erg bedankt voor je directe bijdrage(n) aan het vectorexperiment dat niet alleen dankzij jou kwalitatief beter is geworden, maar tevens aangenamer was om uit te voeren in de soms koude en duistere nachten in Heteren;

Hans Peter, er zijn vele AIOs en OIOs die bouwen op jouw grote praktische kennis van genetica, maar vooral ook van data analyse, zo ook ik. Weet daarom dat veel waardering is terug te vinden in elk van deze proefschriften, en niet in de laatste plaats in dit proefschrift!

I would also like to say special thanks to Dave Goulson and his girlfriend for your kind help and hospitality when Danille and I were in the UK to collect fungal samples;

to Jacqui Shykoff and Oliver Kaltz for useful discussions, and for your help on methodological issues when Jos and I visited your lab in Paris;

and to the following persons for their hints and tips by phone or email contact: Erika Bucheli, Manfred Ruddat, Jerome Goudet, Joe Felsenstein, Manja Kwak and Ola Jennersten.

Als laatste wil ik nog een aantal mensen bedanken in mijn persoonlijke omgeving. Vrienden zijn altijd erg belangrijk voor mij geweest, en in Heteren heb ik er zeker een aantal nieuwe bijgekregen. Toch wil ik van mijn oude vrienden de volgende hier noemen. Paul, ik ben blij dat ik al zo snel de eer van het paranimf zijn kan retourneren, Henri en Ren, fijn dat wij ondanks de drukte van onze proefschriften altijd wel een weekendje hebben kunnen vrijmaken voor een club culinair. Ik hoop dat dit nu weer wat vaker zal gebeuren nu al onze proefschriften bijna gereed zijn. Peter en Petrick, ik ben blij dat onze vriendschap van het eerste uur (op het LFC dan h) nog altijd bestaat. Fijn dat we ondanks de steeds groter wordende afstanden toch regelmatig contact houden, hetgeen wat mij betreft mag duren tot aan de laatste uurtjes Natuurlijk wil ik op deze plaats ook mijn ouders bedanken, die mij altijd onvoorwaardelijk hebben gesteund, maar die pas sinds kort lijken te beseffen dat hun middelste zoon nu echt doctor gaat worden. Jullie weten niet half hoe moeilijk dat zou zijn geweest zonder zon vertrouwde thuisbasis in Elburg, waar Danille en ik, maar ongetwijfeld ook Henk en Hans (en Terry) graag thuiskomen. Niets is echter onvergankelijk. Toch hoop ik dat die situatie er tot in lengte van dagen onveranderd zal zijn, zeker nu jullie bijna allebei van jullie VUT dreigen te kunnen gaan genieten.

Tot slot richt ik mijn woorden tot jou, Danille;

mijn licht, liefde en leven, jij weet als geen ander hoe belangrijk je voor me bent, en jou zou ik eigenlijk nog wel het meest van allemaal moeten bedanken. Niet alleen heb je een directe bijdrage geleverd aan dit proefschrift door met mij schimmelsporen te gaan verzamelen in Engeland (in jouw vakantie!), maar heb je bovenal mij altijd door dik en dun gesteund, zodat ik dit proefschrift tijdig kon afwerken. Dit ging het laatste jaar zeker ten koste van onze tijd samen. We hebben sowieso al een moeilijk laatste jaar achter de rug, en eigenlijk heb ik er niet altijd ten volle voor je kunnen zijn. Toch ben je altijd op de eerste plaats in mijn gedachten geweest. Ik zie er dan ook naar uit deze zomer eindelijk weer eens ons tentje te kunnen gaan pakken, ditmaal in ons knusse autootje, vervolgens weg te rijden richting zuiden (oosten, westen of noorden) om zorgeloos een aantal weken vakantie te gaan vieren met jou, afgesproken?

I IT Pim van Putten werd geboren 24 december 1971 te Lelystad. Van 1979- doorliep hij christelijke basisschool Prins Willem Alexander in Elburg. Hierna bezocht hij protestants christelijke scholengemeenschap Lambert Franckens College in Elburg, alwaar hij in mei 1990 eindexamen VWO B deed. Aansluitend werd begonnen met de studie Biologie aan de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. In augustus 1996 studeerde hij af als bioloog met als afstudeerrichting populatiegenetica.

Gedurende deze afstudeerfase verrichtte hij onderzoek aan de effecten van homozygotie op de stressgevoeligheid in Drosophila melanogaster, onder supervisie van dr. R. Bijlsma, en aan breedtegraadvariatie in vleugellengte in D. melanogaster, onder supervisie van dr. J. van t Land. Voor deze laatste studie werden in februari en maart 1995 door hem en dr. Van t Land fruitvliegen verzameld in Chili, in samenwerking met dr. H. Villarroel en de Universiteit van Playa Ancha te Valparaso, Chili. In een derde afstudeeronderwerp in Groningen werd door hem de hoeveelheid genetische variatie in deze Zuid-Amerikaanse populaties fruitvliegen onderzocht met behulp van RAPDs, onder supervisie van dr. L. van de Zande.

Vanaf maart 1997 was hij werkzaam als onderzoeker in opleiding bij de werkgroep Populatiebiologie van Planten van het Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologisch Onderzoek, centrum voor Terrestrische Ecologie (NIOO-CTO) te Heteren, alwaar het promotieonderzoek werd uitgevoerd dat is beschreven in dit proefschrift.

Vanaf december 2001 is hij werkzaam als postdoc bij de vakgroep populatiegenetica van de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, alwaar hij werkt aan het evolutionair aanpassingsvermogen van genetisch verarmde (ingeteelde) populaties van D. melanogaster onder veranderende omgevingsomstandigheden.

I T I TI BIJLSMA R, J BUNDGAARD, AC BOEREMA and WF VAN PUTTEN (1997) Genetic and environmental stress, and the persistence of populations, pp. 193-208 in Environmental Stress, Adaptation and Evolution, edited by R. Bijlsma and V. Loeschcke. Birkhuser, Basel.

BIJLSMA R, J BUNDGAARD and WF VAN PUTTEN (1999) Environmental dependence of inbreeding depression and purging in Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 12:

1125-1137.

VAN T LAND J, P VAN PUTTEN, B ZWAAN, A KAMPING and W VAN DELDEN (1999) Latitudinal variation in wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster: heritabilities and reaction norms.

Journal of Evolutionary Biology 12: 222-232.

VAN T LAND J, WF VAN PUTTEN, H VILLARROEL, A KAMPING and W VAN DELDEN (2000) Latitudinal variation for two enzyme loci and an inversion polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster from Central and South America. Evolution 54: 201-209.

VAN PUTTEN WF, A BIERE and JMM VAN DAMME (2002a) Host-related genetic differentiation in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum in sympatric, parapatric and allopatric populations of two host species Silene latifolia and S. dioica. Submitted to Molecular Ecology. (Chapter 1) VAN PUTTEN WF, A BIERE and JMM VAN DAMME (2002b) Intraspecific competition and mating between fungal isolates of the anther smut Microbotryum violaceum from the host plant Silene latifolia and S. dioica. Submitted to Evolution. (Chapter 3) VAN PUTTEN WF, JA ELZINGA, A BIERE and JMM VAN DAMME (2002c) Host fidelity of the pollinator guilds of Silene dioica and S. latifolia;

possible consequences for host race differentiation of a venereal disease in sympatry. Submitted to Oecologia. (Chapter 4) The research described in this thesis, NIOO-thesis number 13, was conducted at the department of Plant Population Biology, Center for Terrestrial Ecology of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-CTO) in Heteren, The Netherlands. The Netherlands Institute of Ecology is one of the institutes of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). This study was financially supported by the Earth and Life Science Foundation of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO-ALW);

grant 805-36-391.

Pages:     | 1 | 2 ||



2011 www.dissers.ru -

, .
, , , , 1-2 .